Fila Sophia

applied philosophy, deep democracy, sustainability / by A.R.Teleb

Category Archives: Philosophy

Trump To Sanders: Does the New US Political Spectrum Mean a Renaissance of Democracy?

Short answer is yes. Rather than a “crisis” of representative democracy as so many journalists and academics have contended since 2016, the recent opening up of the political spectrum in … Continue reading

2019-12-06 · Leave a comment

The Making of Homo Probabilis

A review of Ivan Ascher’s Portfolio Society Ascher, Ivan. 2016. Portfolio society: on the capitalist mode of prediction. New York: Zone books. Portfolio society is such a well-written book of … Continue reading

2016-12-22 · Leave a comment

How We Will Come to Appreciate Donald Trump

Sometimes the sense of external oppression acts as a challenge and arouses intellectual energy and excites courage. – John Dewey The United States will experience a significant economic boom over the … Continue reading

2016-11-24 · Leave a comment

Structure Not Policy: Why We Need More Institutional Political Theory

For too long, I’ve been repeating the self-styled slogan “structure not policy, tomorrow not today” to express the idea that has haunted me since I began studying law. Nearly every … Continue reading

2015-02-02 · 2 Comments

A European Europe?

[Also on SpeakOut 5 Feb, 2015] With the frenzy in Europe and parts of the United States, after the Pegida demonstrations and the Charlie Hebdo attacks, it is worth pausing to … Continue reading

2015-01-23 · Leave a comment

The Journey: Cavafy’s Ithaka

What does this poem mean? The question is rhetorical. Journey, Odyssey: The journey as destination is a cliche that says nothing. The question is rhetorical, because an answer is death. … Continue reading

2015-01-22 · Leave a comment

Family & Polis

A review of Kennan Ferguson’s All in the Family This book follows the “contestation” line of political theory, exemplified by William Connolly, Chantal Mouffe, or Bonnie Honig, that owes much … Continue reading

2014-06-14 · Leave a comment